Archive of Developmentally Appropriate Practice

Can Toddlers Understand Complex Grammar? Thumbnail

Can Toddlers Understand Complex Grammar?

Posted on January 01, 2012

Children are able to comprehend complex grammar at a younger age than previously believed, a new study shows. When learning a language, young children must understand the meaning of words as well as how to combine them into a sentence to communicate meaning. Many 2-year-olds rarely combine more than two words together, saying "more juice," for instance, but not yet forming full sentences. However, new research suggests that even before 2-year-olds speak in full sentences, they are able

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Managing Early Childhood Transition Time

Posted on December 12, 2011

Pushing in line. Fighting over toys. Running for the playground—and falling. Distracted faces. Tears and frustration. Many early-childhood teachers will witness such drama in the coming weeks—and may even share in the tears and frustration. Not all children are ready to learn when they enter school. And sometimes we don't do enough to help them. Before students even arrive, new teachers should consider how to handle all the "in-between times" during the school day. For instance, h

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Study: Bilingual Homes Help Babies Exercise Their Brain

Posted on December 12, 2011

Brain flexibility lasts longer when more than one language is spoken at home, buy research shows Babies living in bilingual homes have a longer period of time when their brain is flexible to different languages than infants living where just one language is spoken, remedy researchers say. The new study looked at infants living in bilingual (English and Spanish) and monolingual homes (English or Spanish), and found that the brains of babies in bilingual homes remained flexible to languages

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Neuroscience and how we Learn

Posted on December 12, 2011

High-quality education research Thanks to advancements in sociology, psychology, and neuroscience, our knowledge of how people learn continues to expand. Since the 1990s, with the advent of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), scientists have been looking inside the brain in ways they never have before. New images of the brain coupled with research findings from brain-related research is changing how we think about learning and, therefore, how we think about teaching. Our brai

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Is SpongeBob SquarePants Bad for Children?

Posted on December 12, 2011

Recent viewers of “SpongeBob SquarePants” did worse on attention tests. Researchers report that 4-year-olds who had just watched the fast-paced fantasy cartoon “SpongeBob SquarePants” — which follows the undersea adventures of a yellow sponge — did worse on tests of attention and problem-solving than young children who watched a slower-paced educational program or spent time drawing. “The children who watched the cartoon were operating at half the capacity compared to other chi

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Hispanic Children not Being Served by Preschool Programs

Posted on November 11, 2011

By 2030, clinic mind about one in four children in the United States under the age of 8 will be Hispanic. But these children are often not being served effectively by current preschool programs, salve which may lack Spanish-speaking teachers or culturally appropriate materials and activities. Increased enrollments of Hispanic children in early education programs reflect demographic trends, but Hispanics are the least likely of all ethnic groups to attend preschool. Source: The Hechinger Rep

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What Makes a Quality Preschool? Thumbnail

What Makes a Quality Preschool?

Posted on November 11, 2011

It might seem like preschool is all about naps and playtime, but the latest research shows that early classroom experiences can have a major impact on later learning and academic performance, especially when it comes to language. David Dickinson, a professor of teaching and learning at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College, reported in the journal Science that the quality and type of experiences in preschool can make a difference in how a child's linguistic skills develop. Specifical

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Preschool Participation: Lowered Poverty, Substance Abuse, Incarceration as Adults Thumbnail

Preschool Participation: Lowered Poverty, Substance Abuse, Incarceration as Adults

Posted on October 10, 2011

To cut crime, raise education and income levels, and reduce addiction rates among the poor, no program offers more bang for the buck than preschool, as a new study published in Science demonstrates. The long-term study followed 1,539 children born in 1979-80. They lived in the lowest-income neighborhoods of Chicago, where nearly 40% of residents live below the poverty line; most of the children were African American. More than 950 of the families in the study participated in Chicago's Ch

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More iPads for Preschools, Kindergartens Thumbnail

More iPads for Preschools, Kindergartens

Posted on September 09, 2011

Finger paints, picture books and iPads—the newest classroom tools for some preschools, kindergartens. Despite tight budgets, 'this is teaching to their world,' educator says. Dozens of preschool and kindergarten teachers are adding iPads to their classroom stocks of pencils and paints in an effort to hook young learners with the newest technology craze at the same time—or even before—their parents adopt it. "This is teaching to their world," said Superintendent Linda Vieth of Su

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Learning new Words: Repetition or Insight?

Posted on June 06, 2011

Study Finds Sudden Insights Key to Learning Words Parents and teachers often use flashcards and picture books to teach young children new words, click but a new study suggests that understanding basic words may come from a flash of initial insight more than repetition. “What we know is children are getting a lot of input from their world, pill and they are teasing out what information is useful or not useful, prescription ” said Janice H. Im, the interim chief program officer for the Was

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