Archive of Emotional Disturbance (ED)

Does Co-Teaching Work for Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders? Thumbnail

Does Co-Teaching Work for Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders?

Posted on June 06, 2012

In the past decade, about it increased emphasis on academic instruction for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) has replaced the misguided notion that teachers must focus exclusively or primarily on behavior problems before they can effectively teach students with EBD. Numerous scholars have noted that academic instruction should be the first line of defense in dealing with the prevention, ask amelioration, mind and treatment of EBD. At a minimum, we would argue that effe

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Dad’s Depression May Raise Kids’ Risk of Emotional Problems Thumbnail

Dad’s Depression May Raise Kids’ Risk of Emotional Problems

Posted on February 02, 2012

Study Shows Impact of Fathers' Depression on Children's Emotional Development Children of depressed dads are more likely to have emotional and behavioral problems, compared with kids whose dads are not depressed, according to a new study. According to the findings, a child's risk for emotional or behavioral problems was still much greater if their mothers, rather than fathers, were depressed or had other emotional problems (19% vs. 11%, respectively). Children were even more likely to

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Engaging Students with Behavioral Disabilities With Technology Thumbnail

Engaging Students with Behavioral Disabilities With Technology

Posted on January 01, 2012

A former National Teacher of the Year finds that multimedia instructional technology helps engage students with severe emotional disabilities. I regularly receive such students, young people who have slid down the "continuum of educational services" and landed hard at the high school where I work. Most arrive angry, and some threaten to drop out of school. They are part of a subculture of students classified with emotional and behavioral disabilities, the type of students who do not belie

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Texas Expells, Suspends 75% of Special Education Students

Posted on December 12, 2011

New Report Critical of Discipline Procedures in Texas: The researchers looked at records for close to one million students and found that 75 percent of middle and high school students with disabilities in the nation's second-largest public school system were suspended, expelled, or both at least once. That compares to about 55 percent of students without a disability. But the punishments weren't handed out equally across all types of students with disabilities. Of students with an emotiona

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Neuroscience and how we Learn Thumbnail

Neuroscience and how we Learn

Posted on December 12, 2011

High-quality education research Thanks to advancements in sociology, psychology, and neuroscience, our knowledge of how people learn continues to expand. Since the 1990s, with the advent of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), scientists have been looking inside the brain in ways they never have before. New images of the brain coupled with research findings from brain-related research is changing how we think about learning and, therefore, how we think about teaching. Our brai

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Zero Tolerance? Thumbnail

Zero Tolerance?

Posted on November 11, 2011

More schools rethinking zero-tolerance discipline stand Nearly two decades after a zero-tolerance culture took hold in American schools, buy information pills a growing number of educators and elected leaders are scaling back discipline policies that led to lengthy suspensions and ousters for such mistakes as carrying toy guns or Advil. This rethinking has come in North Carolina and Denver, mind in Baltimore and Los Angeles—part of a phenomenon driven by high suspension rates, community

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The Past Is Prologue: Suggestions for Moving Forward in Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Thumbnail

The Past Is Prologue: Suggestions for Moving Forward in Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Posted on October 10, 2011

The Past Is Prologue The behavioral approach to teaching was relatively new in 1967 and considerably more helpful to teachers than the psychodynamic ideas of just accepting behavior and trying to understand unconscious motivations (Berkowitz & Rothman, sildenafil 1960). We were really excited by the ‘‘new’’ science of applied behavior analysis, cheap and the early work of Ivar Lovaas at University of California, help Los Angeles, with autistic children and the launching in 1968

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Creating a Positive Classroom Atmosphere: Teachers’ Use of Effective Praise and Feedback Thumbnail

Creating a Positive Classroom Atmosphere: Teachers’ Use of Effective Praise and Feedback

Posted on October 10, 2011

Creating a positive and engaging classroom atmosphere is one of the most powerful tools teachers can use to encourage children’s learning and prevent problem behaviors from occurring. Although a number of factors are related to a positive classroom atmosphere, viagra order such as classroom management techniques and instructional pacing, prescription one important factor is how teachers attend or respond to children’s behaviors. Teachers’ responses to children’s appropriate and probl

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Conversations About Race and Student Learning Thumbnail

Conversations About Race and Student Learning

Posted on August 08, 2011

A recent UCLA study on suspension rates in schools had startling results: Students of color were not only more likely to be suspended than their white counterparts, information pills but also to be suspended for less serious offenses than white students. "There are very few schools with mixed demographics that don’t have disparities present, erectile " said presenter Michelle Garcia. Garcia, for sale the special projects manager from the Teaching Tolerance project at the Southern Poverty

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No Lasting Problems Seen for “Late Talkers” Thumbnail

No Lasting Problems Seen for “Late Talkers”

Posted on July 07, 2011

At age 2, approved the children identified as “late talkers” were more likely than other toddlers to have behavioral problems. But there was no difference between the groups at ages 5, visit this 8, prescription 10, 14 and 17. The study, published online on Monday in the journal Pediatrics, followed children who were part of the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort Study, including 1,245 children whose speech was not delayed — they were using at least 50 words and could string two or

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