Archive of Significant Cognitive Disabilities

Student With Disability Eligible for School, but Not Sports Thumbnail

Student With Disability Eligible for School, but Not Sports

Posted on December 12, 2011

  A North Carolina high school football player with Down syndrome is off the team. It's not because Brett Bowden can't play well—in fact he rarely played at all, according to several news reports. But Mr. Bowden, 19, is too old to be a part of the team at Hobbton High School in Newton Grove, N.C., southeast of Raleigh. He's been on the team for two years. Although the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act allows children to have educational services through their 22nd bi

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Down Syndrome Study Finds Families Are Happy

Posted on November 11, 2011

Having a child with Down syndrome may come as a surprise, but it’s a good experience, families are reporting in a trio of new surveys. Researchers surveyed more than 3,000 family members and people with the chromosomal disorder across the country for what’s believed to be one of the largest looks at life with Down syndrome. The findings, which will be published in three articles in the October issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics, offer a rosy picture. The vast majori

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Andrews’ Story

Posted on October 10, 2011

Dear Directors and Educators, Andrew: When Andrew was old enough to register for Kindergarten, we didn’t actually plan to put him into a “regular school” environment. We were told by his preschool teachers that he wasn’t anywhere near ready for public school and, frankly, we agreed with them. Andrew was born with Down Syndrome. He also has autism and is non-verbal. As a child he didn’t answer to his name, he wasn’t potty-trained, and he didn’t really know how to sit. He w

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Layton Police: Locate Children With Autism who Wander Thumbnail

Layton Police: Locate Children With Autism who Wander

Posted on October 10, 2011

  There's nothing worse than losing your child. Worse still, is if the child does have autism — with its various accompanying challenges that keep individuals from realizing the danger they're in. "We’re dealing with children and adults who are non-verbal, who are not able to express themselves, who have no safety awareness," Anderson said. "They don't know that they're lost or, in our case, our son wouldn't stop. He would just keep going. He would walk into a home. He would get into

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Study: Developmental Delay for Late Preterm Babies

Posted on October 10, 2011

Developmental Risks Are Possible for Babies Delivered at 34 to 36 Weeks of Pregnancy Late preterm babies born from 34 to 36 weeks of pregnancy may be at an increased risk for modest developmental and academic problems up to age 7, when compared to babies born at full term, according to a new study. Most research on the risks associated with preterm birth looks at infants born between 23 and 28 weeks of pregnancy, but significant brain development takes place in the last four to six weeks

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States Pressured to Curb Test Exemptions for Students With Disabilities

Posted on August 08, 2011

Pressure from the U.S. Department of Education has led some states to curb a testing exemption that applies to only the 1 percent of students with the most severe disabilities, but districts that have long used that flexibility to win some breathing room in their accountability systems are bristling. Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, states are allowed to administer exams based on alternate standards to students with severe cognitive impairments and then count those scores towar

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What Happens to Test Scores When you Just Raise the Standard? Thumbnail

What Happens to Test Scores When you Just Raise the Standard?

Posted on August 08, 2011

Mentally disabled kids' test scores plummet A mere 4% show proficiency in math on the Hawaii State Alternate Assessment The Department of Education is trying to determine why reading and math test scores for students with severe cognitive disabilities dropped so dramatically this year with the introduction of a more academically rigorous annual assessment. Just 4 percent of students who took the Hawaii State Alternate Assessment tested proficient in math, down from 62 percent in 2010

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Using iPads to Teach Vocabulary

Posted on May 05, 2011

Elementary School kids use iPad app to learn pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary For some kids, the letter "R" can be a little tricky to say. "George" can sound like "Joy-ge," and "grape" somehow comes out like "gwape." Katie Kelley, a 29-year-old speech pathologist at Hazeldale Elementary School, hopes using an iPad in her lessons will help kids with speech, language and social communication delays learn proper pronunciation. Last year, Kelley began playing with apps, or software app

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The Common Core for Students With Significant Disabilities Thumbnail

The Common Core for Students With Significant Disabilities

Posted on May 05, 2011

School districts in Utah are planning professional development for the coming year around the new Common Core Standards.  Teachers of students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities do not need to feel left out of the Common Core conversation.  For the last several years, the Utah State Department of Education has been encouraging teachers to become familiar with the Extended Core Standards and use them in IEP development and lesson planning.  Diane Browder, Ph.D., professor of Special E

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Will Alternative Tests Continue for Students With Disabilities? Thumbnail

Will Alternative Tests Continue for Students With Disabilities?

Posted on April 04, 2011

A provision that allows schools to use modified assessments for students with disabilities is expected to be excluded from a revision to the nation's education law. Many advocates and educators agree the so-called "2% rule"—which allows the exams to be used for no more than 2% of total number of students taking them—is not being used consistently and has served to perpetuate low expectations for students with disabilities. There is support for new tests being developed along with the com

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