Archive of Deafblindness

The Critical Need for Providing Early Visual Language to the Deaf Child Thumbnail

The Critical Need for Providing Early Visual Language to the Deaf Child

Posted on May 05, 2012

Research has indicated that the language areas of the brain have no preference for language input and that the most accessible pathway for full access to linguistic information for many deaf children is through the visual channel. A visual language, such as American Sign Language, is a natural language system, functions independently from spoken language, and has a fully developed grammatical system. Delay in acquiring a first language produces poorer over-all language performance, and witho

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Shortage of Interpreters for Students Who Are Deaf Thumbnail

Shortage of Interpreters for Students Who Are Deaf

Posted on February 02, 2012

As states raise the requirements for educational interpreters for deaf children in schools, some students are left without qualified translators in school. The 2004 Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act for the first time defined the role of an educational interpreter, but allowed states to establish standards for interpreters in schools, says Brenda Schick, a professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. During the past seven years, 26 states have adopted the E

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Technology Has Changed the Teaching of Deaf Students Thumbnail

Technology Has Changed the Teaching of Deaf Students

Posted on December 12, 2011

Changes in technology have had a dramatic effect on how children who are deaf or hard of hearing are taught, according to a new report from Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education. Technology, including visual or text-communication devices and speech-to-print software as well as the wider use of cochlear implants, can generally be positive influences on these students' access to a free, appropriate education as required under the federal Individua

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Reevaluating Most Appropriate and Least Restrictive: Is Mainstreaming Working for the Deaf Child? Thumbnail

Reevaluating Most Appropriate and Least Restrictive: Is Mainstreaming Working for the Deaf Child?

Posted on November 11, 2011

Education for the child who is deaf has stood in a quagmire regarding what is most appropriate and least restrictive since the mid-70s. What has transpired, and continues to transpire, has left many deaf children educationally, socially, linguistically, and emotionally impoverished. Has not history taught us that African-American, Hispanic, Oriental, and Deaf children do, in fact, grow up to be African-American, Hispanic, Oriental, and Deaf adults who have and continue to find their niche in Ame

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States Pressured to Curb Test Exemptions for Students With Disabilities Thumbnail

States Pressured to Curb Test Exemptions for Students With Disabilities

Posted on August 08, 2011

Pressure from the U.S. Department of Education has led some states to curb a testing exemption that applies to only the 1 percent of students with the most severe disabilities, but districts that have long used that flexibility to win some breathing room in their accountability systems are bristling. Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, states are allowed to administer exams based on alternate standards to students with severe cognitive impairments and then count those scores towar

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Student-Built Technology Helping Low-Vision Students Thumbnail

Student-Built Technology Helping Low-Vision Students

Posted on July 07, 2011

One of my favorite teams participating in the recent Imagine Cup 2011 Finals was Note-Taker, a team out of Arizona State University. Like all the teams in Microsoft’s student technology competition, Team Note-Taker has developed a tool that tackles a real-world problem. And as with several of the teams, that problem was understood intimately by one of the team members. Note-Taker is a tool designed to help visually-impaired students with, as the name suggests, taking notes in class. Non

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Utah Students Stay Home; Oregon Dog Goes to School Thumbnail

Utah Students Stay Home; Oregon Dog Goes to School

Posted on May 05, 2011

During the next four weeks, students at three campuses of Utah's Schools for the Deaf and Blind will have long weekends—but the days off are unplanned holidays that are the result of a shortfall in money to keep the schools open. The furlough days, which are scheduled for this Friday, plus May 6 and May 20, means full-time students will have to stay home and teachers and staff won't be paid, saving the school $200,000. Students who attend only on those days but spend the rest of their s

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The Preparation of Bilingual/Bicultural Education Professionals for the 0-5 Deaf Child: Research-Based Practices Thumbnail

The Preparation of Bilingual/Bicultural Education Professionals for the 0-5 Deaf Child: Research-Based Practices

Posted on March 03, 2011

Deaf children with hearing parents are often raised in homes where an accessible language is not shared with their parents. These children are not able to have an accessible language and the linguistic opportunities needed to acquire a first language. Resultantly, the developmental milestones crucial to the development of the conceptual knowledge that interaction through a language promotes are lost. Academic and social achievement that depends on having a strong language base and conceptual

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What Works! Teacher Mediation with Educational Videos For Deaf Children Thumbnail

What Works! Teacher Mediation with Educational Videos For Deaf Children

Posted on March 03, 2011

Many educators and parents are aware of the benefits of read aloud to children. This is one of the most important things you can do. Research has shown that when adults engage their children during shared book reading that children are more engaged and attentive to the books. This in turn encourages their potential for learning literacy skills. The same is true for Deaf children. Research has shown that there are many effective strategies adults can use when reading aloud. These strategie

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Transition Timeline For Children and Adolescents with Deafblindness and/or Severe Disabilities Thumbnail

Transition Timeline For Children and Adolescents with Deafblindness and/or Severe Disabilities

Posted on March 03, 2011

Children and families experience many transitions, large and small, over the years. Three predictable transitions occur: 1. When children reach school age. 2. When they approach adolescence. 3. When children move from adolescence to adulthood. Other transitions children make include moving into new programs, working with new agencies and care providers, and making new friends. Transition involves changes, adding new expectations, responsibilities, or resources, and letting go of othe

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