Archive of Coaching & Mentoring

Coaching: Hugs Or Slugs: What Will It Be Today? Thumbnail

Coaching: Hugs Or Slugs: What Will It Be Today?

Posted on March 03, 2012

Supporting High Expectations for Students with Disabilities We are the two special education academic support coaches “unofficially” known by our elementary special education self-contained teachers as the “curriculum enforcers” for the Salt Lake City School District. Our positions were created three years ago when Salt Lake City School District leadership adopted the expectation that elementary students with disabilities who were expected to take grade level CRTs at the end of th

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Changing Mindsets: High Expectations for All Students Thumbnail

Changing Mindsets: High Expectations for All Students

Posted on March 03, 2012

Helping All Students to Succeed “If you want to bring about a fundamental change in people’s belief and behavior, a change that will persist and serve as an example to others, you need to create a community around them, where those new beliefs can be practiced and expressed and nurtured.” Malcolm Gladwell,The Tipping Point (2002)  Salt Lake City School District is a district rich with diversity, and we celebrate that diversity. Our commitment to students and families is to help all

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Technology Immersion: a District Perspective Thumbnail

Technology Immersion: a District Perspective

Posted on March 03, 2012

Changing the Landscape of Teaching and Learning in Provo School District In May of 2011, the UPDC (Utah Personnel Development Center) showcased Provo School District’s technology immersion initiative to improve achievement of all students. This immersion has changed their landscape of teaching and learning for all teachers and students. This article first highlights the big ideas presented by Provo District’s Technology Director, Ted Kelly. Next, it highlights responses from a cros

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Coaching: Providing “Hard Feedback” for Improved Outcomes Thumbnail

Coaching: Providing “Hard Feedback” for Improved Outcomes

Posted on March 03, 2012

Educational researchers Brian Lord, Kate Cress, and Barbara Miller (2008) describe hard feedback as crucial to instructional improvement. They explain: “By hard feedback, we refer to instances where a teacher leader’s honest critique of classroom practice is issued even though the critique actively challenges the teacher’s preferred practice and may lead the teacher to experience some level of professional discomfort”. Hard feedback is necessary to facilitate deep and sustainable cha

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Grouping Struggling Readers Thumbnail

Grouping Struggling Readers

Posted on February 02, 2012

There are a variety of grouping formats that have been proven effective for teaching reading to students with learning disabilities: whole class, small group, pairs, and one-on-one. This article summarizes the research and implications for practice for using each of these grouping formats in the general education classroom. In this article: Overview: Grouping practices Whole-class instruction Small-group instruction Peer pairing and tutoring One-on-one instruction Authors:

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Closing America’s Achievement Gap: A Powerful Tool is Being Ignored Thumbnail

Closing America’s Achievement Gap: A Powerful Tool is Being Ignored

Posted on February 02, 2012

Invented nearly 50 years ago, Direct Instruction (DI) is a scripted, step-by-step approach to teaching that is among the most thoroughly tested and proven in the history of education. It works equally well for general education, gifted students, and the disabled, but surprisingly remains lttle used. DI was the clear winner in the federal government’s 10-year Follow Through project—the largest study in history to compare different approaches to instruction. In the 40 years since Follow Thr

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Five Big Changes to the Future of Teacher Education Thumbnail

Five Big Changes to the Future of Teacher Education

Posted on February 02, 2012

  Teachers must be prepared to find and adapt new technologies to engage the digital generation, as well as work across traditional subject areas using project learning. They must be able to use data and evidence to inform their practice and know how to work in both virtual learning environments and brick-and-mortar schools. And they’ll need to collaborate with community-based organizations and work in schools that provide all kinds of other services for students and their families

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I.M (in) Focus: Progress-Monitoring Teachers Thumbnail

I.M (in) Focus: Progress-Monitoring Teachers

Posted on February 02, 2012

Over the last several years there has been greater teacher accountability for student outcomes. Gone are the days when teachers could close the door and teach whatever they wanted to teach. While such an approach can be enticing as we can focus on those things that are most interesting to us, or about which we have the greatest knowledge, it does little to ensure students are taught what they need to know or that ALL students are provided a high-quality education. That assurance of student lea

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What Gifted Students Want From Teachers Thumbnail

What Gifted Students Want From Teachers

Posted on February 02, 2012

Can you imagine having a young Mark Zuckerberg in your classroom? What about Lady Gaga in her preteen years? Both participated in gifted and talented programs when they were students. Today, the National Association of Gifted Children estimates that nearly three million American students are gifted and talented. Teaching these students can be rewarding: They often learn new skills quickly, absorb oodles of information, take on leadership roles, and eagerly employ higher-order thinking ski

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Professional Learning Networks Taking Off Thumbnail

Professional Learning Networks Taking Off

Posted on February 02, 2012

Face-to-face interaction has its benefits, but busy educators who want to ask advice, offer opinions, and engage in deep discussions with colleagues are increasingly turning to professional learning networks—online communities that allow the sharing of lesson plans, teaching strategies, and student work, as well as collaboration across grade levels and departments. “You get a chance to see what some of the best teachers in the field are doing, and you can do it on your own time at hom

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