Archive of Basic Psychological Processes

WOODCOCK JOHNSON IV UPDATE Thumbnail

WOODCOCK JOHNSON IV UPDATE

Posted on May 05, 2014

WOODCOCK JOHNSON IV UPDATE  As part of my role at the UPDC, I have been the specialist responsible for teaching standardized assessments, and in particular the WJ III. The newest version is due to be released this June, and I have been asked many questions regarding the changes and my observations concerning possible adoption and training. To date, there has been very little specific information released regarding the newest incarnation of the Woodcock suite of assessments. I participated in

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Specific Learning Disabilities and the Language of Learning Thumbnail

Specific Learning Disabilities and the Language of Learning

Posted on April 04, 2014

Specific Learning Disabilities and the Language of Learning: Explicit, visit web Systematic Teaching of Academic Vocabulary What is academic language? Academic language is the language of textbooks, in classrooms, and on tests.  It is different in structure and vocabulary from the everyday spoken English of social interactions.  Many students who speak English well have trouble comprehending the academic language used in high school and college classrooms. The main barrier to student compre

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Cognitive Processing and the WJ III for  Reading Disability (Dyslexia) Identification Thumbnail

Cognitive Processing and the WJ III for Reading Disability (Dyslexia) Identification

Posted on April 04, 2014

Cognitive Processing and the WJ III for Reading Disability Identification March 5, 2010 NASP Convention, Chicago Presenters:  Nancy Mather & Barbara Wendling Topics What is a specific reading disability (dyslexia)? How do Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) Factors relate to reading difficulties? What other cognitive and linguistic factors are important for the diagnosis of dyslexia? Overview of the WJ III Discrepancy and Variation Procedures WJ III Case Study Examples W

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“Math Class is Tough”, Ms. Barbie Doll, 1997 Thumbnail

“Math Class is Tough”, Ms. Barbie Doll, 1997

Posted on March 03, 2012

In the world that Barbie lives, we can laugh about her math difficulties. Maybe like Barbie, we have had our own difficulties with math, knew someone who felt they had poor math skills, didn’t like math in school, had adverse feelings towards math in school or just couldn’t “get it”. Why do some kids “get it” and some struggle with basic math skills? Math instruction does not have the extensive research that has benefited literacy instruction, but there is research starting to

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Good Instruction Activates Prior Knowledge

Posted on March 03, 2012

"My mom is a hero," Alfredo said, cutting me off one sentence into a picture book about Martin Luther King, Jr. His chubby second-grade body perpetually squirmed on the rug where my 32 students were seated. "She brought us here from El Salvador by herself. Me, my two sisters, and our baby brother. We walked." "My mom is a hero too," said Catalina. "She brought us from Mexico. But we came in a truck." "The desert was hot," Alfredo cut her off. "The truck was hot," Catalina said. The two be

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Autism Result Of Scores Of Genetic Mutations

Posted on January 01, 2012

Hundreds of spontaneous gene mutations may be responsible for the development of autism in families without a history of the disorder. In three studies published Thursday in the journal Neuron, researchers from Yale University, Columbia University and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York looked at gene analyses from over 1,000 families where one child had an autism diagnosis but the parents and the child’s siblings did not. They found that children with autism had more copy number var

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Assessment Interpretation: Predicted Achievement/Achievement Discrepancy Procedure Thumbnail

Assessment Interpretation: Predicted Achievement/Achievement Discrepancy Procedure

Posted on January 01, 2012

In discrepancy analysis, assessing the student with co-normed cognitive and achievement batteries holds many advantages, as opposed to using one brand of cognitive and another of achievement. Co-normed data represents true discrepancies, while different branded data must be statistically estimated. The Predicted Achievement/Achievement Discrepancy Procedure is designed to predict a student's learning potential in a narrow achievement area for the near term. It is not designed to predict achie

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Putting the Discrepancy Model to Rest

Posted on December 12, 2011

Intelligent Thinking vs. Intelligence Testing Much has been written during the past three decades about approaches to evaluation and decision-making regarding who does and does not qualify for the classification of specific learning disabilities (LD). The vast majority of students who have undergone assessments to determine eligibility under the LD category have been subject to a battery of tests, pill most often administered by individuals who had: no first-hand knowledge of their instructio

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Advantages of Dyslexia? Thumbnail

Advantages of Dyslexia?

Posted on December 12, 2011

Handicap or Advantage? Normally dyslexia is considered a handicap: a mental deficiency that makes reading, website like this long-division, no rx and remembering whether letters and numbers face left or right difficult. Challenging this view, and learning disabilities experts Brock and Fernette Eide argue that dyslexia is an alternative way brains can be wired — one with many advantages. While dyslexic children may struggle in the early grades, they often grow into gifted story tellers,

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Math Difference or Disability? Thumbnail

Math Difference or Disability?

Posted on June 06, 2011

Study Helps Pinpoint Math Disability Burgeoning research into students’ difficulties with mathematics is starting to tease out cognitive differences between students who sometimes struggle with math and those who have dyscalculia, price a severe, persistent learning disability in math. A new, decade-long longitudinal study by researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, published Friday in the journal Child Development, finds that 9th-graders considered dyscalculic—those w

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