Archive of Culture

Specific Learning Disabilities and the Language of Learning Thumbnail

Specific Learning Disabilities and the Language of Learning

Posted on April 04, 2014

Specific Learning Disabilities and the Language of Learning: Explicit, Systematic Teaching of Academic Vocabulary What is academic language? Academic language is the language of textbooks, in classrooms, and on tests.  It is different in structure and vocabulary from the everyday spoken English of social interactions.  Many students who speak English well have trouble comprehending the academic language used in high school and college classrooms. The main barrier to student comprehension

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A Theater Performance ‘Awakens’ Autistic Student Thumbnail

A Theater Performance ‘Awakens’ Autistic Student

Posted on March 03, 2012

This story is just one example of why theater and arts are important in our lives.  There really is nothing that compares to the magic that happens between a live performance and it’s audience. "It was generally agreed by all that the show was "kind of rough" (tech wise). But after the show we learned that there was a 5 year old autistic child in the house. He had never spoken. But as the lights went down, he began to talk. In full sentences. He called the teacher by name. She had no ide

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Can Cultural Competency be Learned?

Posted on February 02, 2012

Making differences work in schools "Cultural competency" training is designed to give teachers techniques and strategies that can help them not only reach minority students but also capitalize on cultural diversity in the classroom. At its core, cultural competency is about understanding differences and the role those differences play in how best to teach children. For example, many high-achieving schools with large minority populations focus on achievement and visioning, or prompting the

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Learning Disabilities Articles, Resources Available in Spanish Thumbnail

Learning Disabilities Articles, Resources Available in Spanish

Posted on November 11, 2011

NCLD announces: Spanish on LD.org! Recursos en español We’re pleased to introduce our collection of LD articles, transcripts, and worksheets – in Spanish! Browse the collection and spread the word to anyone who might benefit from these resources. Access these resources HERE>

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Want Children to “Pay Attention”? Make Their Brains Curious! Thumbnail

Want Children to “Pay Attention”? Make Their Brains Curious!

Posted on November 11, 2011

A few thousand years ago, in 360 B.C., Plato advised against force-feeding of facts to students. "Elements of instruction...should be presented to the mind in childhood; not, however, under any notion of forcing education. A freeman ought not to be a slave in the acquisition of knowledge of any kind. Bodily exercise, when compulsory, does no harm to the body; but knowledge which is acquired under compulsion obtains no hold on the mind." Children Are Paying Attention, Just Not to the Borin

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Reevaluating Most Appropriate and Least Restrictive: Is Mainstreaming Working for the Deaf Child? Thumbnail

Reevaluating Most Appropriate and Least Restrictive: Is Mainstreaming Working for the Deaf Child?

Posted on November 11, 2011

Education for the child who is deaf has stood in a quagmire regarding what is most appropriate and least restrictive since the mid-70s. What has transpired, and continues to transpire, has left many deaf children educationally, socially, linguistically, and emotionally impoverished. Has not history taught us that African-American, Hispanic, Oriental, and Deaf children do, in fact, grow up to be African-American, Hispanic, Oriental, and Deaf adults who have and continue to find their niche in Ame

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The IRIS Center: Professional Development at Our Fingertips

Posted on October 10, 2011

Quality professional development for teachers is an on-going quest. Both special and general educators often find themselves in the position of knowing what they need to teach but wondering how they’re going to teach a particular concept or skill. Understanding the need for classroom instructional and behavioral support, Vanderbilt University was funded by the U. S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) in 2001 to create a resource for preservice special and g

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Primary Language Support for English Language Learners Thumbnail

Primary Language Support for English Language Learners

Posted on March 03, 2011

One of the greatest strengths ELL students bring to the classroom is their primary language (L1). Richard Ruiz (1984) reminds us that effective programs for ELLs view the primary language as a resource, rather than as a problem to be overcome. Even in non-bilingual classrooms teachers can utilize their students’ L1 in a manner which will make content-area instruction in English much more comprehensible. As Krashen (1985) has pointed out in his Comprehensible Input Hypothesis, students acquir

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What is a Bilingual Speech and Language Assessment? Thumbnail

What is a Bilingual Speech and Language Assessment?

Posted on March 03, 2011

Children who speak a language other than English and children who are bilingual need to be evaluated in their native language or the languages that they speak. When children are evaluated only in one of the languages, or in the language in which they are least proficient, such as English for English Language Learners (ELLs), they are often misdiagnosed with speech and language problems when they do not exist, or the nature of the child’s difficulty is not determined accurately. Some times,

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Closing the Achievement Gap With a Vengeance Thumbnail

Closing the Achievement Gap With a Vengeance

Posted on January 01, 2011

One District’s Journey Into Tiered Instruction (RTI/MTSS) In June of 2009, the Park City Student Services Department and Curriculum Department sat down with our elementary principals to review our elementary language arts CRT data, paying particular attention to subgroups. We asked the question, “Are we happy with our data?” The answer was a resounding, “No!” We were at a crossroads in our school district. With one of the highest second language student ratios in the state of Utah,

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