Archive of Sheltered Instruction – DC

Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students Thumbnail

Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students

Posted on September 09, 2011

What’s the opposite of scaffolding a lesson? It would be saying to students something like, “Read this nine-page science article, write a detailed essay on the topic it explores, and turn it in by Wednesday.” Yikes—no safety net, no parachute, no—just left blowing in the wind. Let’s start by agreeing that scaffolding a lesson and differentiating instruction are two different things. Scaffolding is breaking up the learning into chunks and then providing a tool, or structure, wi

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ELL, SLD or Both? Thumbnail

ELL, SLD or Both?

Posted on May 05, 2011

When ELLs Struggle: Recognizing the Signs It is important for educators who are screening English language learners (ELLs) for learning difficulties to consider that some behaviors that are considered signs of a learning disability also resemble linguistic behaviors of students learning a second language (L2). In addition, the behaviors may reflect cultural differences or values of students coming to U.S. schools from other countries and educational systems. The following table highlig

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Primary Language Support for English Language Learners Thumbnail

Primary Language Support for English Language Learners

Posted on March 03, 2011

One of the greatest strengths ELL students bring to the classroom is their primary language (L1). Richard Ruiz (1984) reminds us that effective programs for ELLs view the primary language as a resource, rather than as a problem to be overcome. Even in non-bilingual classrooms teachers can utilize their students’ L1 in a manner which will make content-area instruction in English much more comprehensible. As Krashen (1985) has pointed out in his Comprehensible Input Hypothesis, students acquir

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Classroom-Tested Tech Tools Used to Boost Literacy Thumbnail

Classroom-Tested Tech Tools Used to Boost Literacy

Posted on March 03, 2011

To improve reading skills, many teachers are harnessing the technology they already have—such as webcams, audio recorders, blogs, and other Web 2.0 tools—to boost literacy in students. “With schools being so cash-strapped, we can’t go around and buy a new program all the time,” says Adina Sullivan, a 4th grade teacher at the 720-student San Marcos Elementary School in California. “You can go with something that you can find a lot easier at no cost and make it work for what you n

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Closing the Achievement Gap With a Vengeance

Posted on January 01, 2011

One District’s Journey Into Tiered Instruction (RTI/MTSS) In June of 2009, the Park City Student Services Department and Curriculum Department sat down with our elementary principals to review our elementary language arts CRT data, paying particular attention to subgroups. We asked the question, “Are we happy with our data?” The answer was a resounding, “No!” We were at a crossroads in our school district. With one of the highest second language student ratios in the state of Utah,

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Park City Gets it Right! Thumbnail

Park City Gets it Right!

Posted on January 01, 2011

Park City Gets it Right! Observations from a Professional Development Specialist. Achievement Gap? The achievement gap is an academic language gap. In most schools, the lowest performing subgroups continue to be English Language Learners (ELL), students in special education, and students in poverty. The common denominator between each of these three groups is the lack of proficiency in academic language. ELL’s lack of academic language is due to lack of exposure (language different).

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Distinguishing Difference from Disability: The Common Causes of Racial/Ethnic Disproportionality in Special Education Thumbnail

Distinguishing Difference from Disability: The Common Causes of Racial/Ethnic Disproportionality in Special Education

Posted on November 11, 2010

Communities Flourish When Equity Matters. Education expands our understanding of ourselves, the worlds in which we live, and the possibilities of what we can become. Students have a right to high-quality learning opportunities in which their cultures, language, and experiences are valued and used to guide their learning. Equity is measured by the degree to which people belong, feel included, and are empowered. Universal equity cannot be achieved without creating systems that embod

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