Why is Professional Development Important for Teachers?

Posted on July 07, 2011

Developmental Risks Are Possible for Babies Delivered at 34 to 36 Weeks of Pregnancy

Late preterm babies born from 34 to 36 weeks of pregnancy may be at an increased risk for modest developmental and academic problems up to age 7, information pills when compared to babies born at full term, viagra according to a new study. Most research on the risks associated with preterm birth looks at infants born between 23 and 28 weeks of pregnancy, but significant brain development takes place in the last four to six weeks of gestation. Interrupting these processes, coupled with the often complicated medical problems faced by premature babies, may account for an increased risk of developmental and academic problems.

“Although late preterm infants were previously considered similar to term infants, emerging evidence suggests that significant adverse developmental outcomes among late preterm infants, which further indicates that longer-term outcomes of prematurity, remain a concern even for those infants born at the more optimistic late-preterm stages of pregnancy,” conclude study researchers led by Jennifer E. McGowan, of the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Queen’s University Belfast in Belfast, U.K. The study suggests that the closer to term a pregnancy goes, the lower these risks. Late preterm babies fare better than those born earlier, but both groups are at greater risk for developmental problems than term infants.

Read more HERE>

Author: Denise Mann, WebMD Health News Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder greatly increases the risk of cigarette smoking and substance abuse in both boys and girls, order U.S. researchers say. Dr. Timothy Wilens of the Massachusetts General Hospital Pediatric Psychopharmacology Unit and colleagues examined data from two previous studies—one of boys, one of girls—that analyzed the prevalence of a broad range of psychiatric and behavioral disorders in participants diagnosed during childhood with ADHD.

Among the ADHD participants, 32 percent developed some type of substance abuse, including cigarette smoking, during the follow-up period, while 25 percent of control participants had substance abuse problems.

The only additional diagnosis that had an effect was conduct disorder, which tripled the risk when combined with ADHD.

Read more about this study HERE>

 
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder greatly increases the risk of cigarette smoking and substance abuse in both boys and girls, thumb U.S. researchers say. Dr. Timothy Wilens of the Massachusetts General Hospital Pediatric Psychopharmacology Unit and colleagues examined data from two previous studies — one of boys, one of girls — that analyzed the prevalence of a broad range of psychiatric and behavioral disorders in participants diagnosed during childhood with ADHD.

Among the ADHD participants, visit 32 percent developed some type of substance abuse, including cigarette smoking, during the follow-up period, while 25 percent of control participants had substance abuse problems.

The only additional diagnosis that had an effect was conduct disorder, which tripled the risk when combined with ADHD.

Read more about this study HERE>

 

 

 

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2011/05/31/ADHD-link-to-more-smoking-substance-abuse/UPI-21381306894129/#ixzz1On7Gwznv

 
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder greatly increases the risk of cigarette smoking and substance abuse in both boys and girls, clinic U.S. researchers say. Dr. Timothy Wilens of the Massachusetts General Hospital Pediatric Psychopharmacology Unit and colleagues examined data from two previous studies — one of boys, approved one of girls — that analyzed the prevalence of a broad range of psychiatric and behavioral disorders in participants diagnosed during childhood with ADHD.

Among the ADHD participants, 32 percent developed some type of substance abuse, including cigarette smoking, during the follow-up period, while 25 percent of control participants had substance abuse problems.

The only additional diagnosis that had an effect was conduct disorder, which tripled the risk when combined with ADHD.

Read more about this study HERE>

 

 

 

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2011/05/31/ADHD-link-to-more-smoking-substance-abuse/UPI-21381306894129/#ixzz1On7Gwznv

 

World geography teacher Valerie Harris posed a question to her students last week at the Hebron Ninth Grade Center: “How is the Kashmir conflict more than just a religious battle?”

Instead of raising their hands to respond, there the students quietly began typing their answers into their smartphones, check laptops and tablet computers arrayed on their desks. Almost immediately, sick their words appeared on an interactive whiteboard at the front of the class.

Welcome to the world of digital learning.

In most classrooms in area schools, cellphones and other devices are banned so students won’t be tempted to text their friends or play games when they’re supposed to be learning. But Lewisville school district officials believe that technology is the way students learn in the 21st century.

They’re testing that theory with the Bring Your Own Technology program that encourages students to bring their personal communication devices to school.

“Our kids are so accustomed to technology, they’re digital natives from birth,” said Mark Dalton, principal of the Hebron Ninth Grade Center, which began piloting the program about eight weeks ago. “To ask them to ‘power down’ when they’re at school is not a natural thing for them.”

Read more HERE>

Author: Wendy Hundley, Dallas News

Photo by:  kodomut
World geography teacher Valerie Harris posed a question to her students last week at the Hebron Ninth Grade Center: “How is the Kashmir conflict more than just a religious battle?”

Instead of raising their hands to respond, link the students quietly began typing their answers into their smartphones, website laptops and tablet computers arrayed on their desks. Almost immediately, order their words appeared on an interactive whiteboard at the front of the class.

Welcome to the world of digital learning.

In most classrooms in area schools, cellphones and other devices are banned so students won’t be tempted to text their friends or play games when they’re supposed to be learning. But Lewisville school district officials believe that technology is the way students learn in the 21st century.

They’re testing that theory with the Bring Your Own Technology program that encourages students to bring their personal communication devices to school.

“Our kids are so accustomed to technology, they’re digital natives from birth,” said Mark Dalton, principal of the Hebron Ninth Grade Center, which began piloting the program about eight weeks ago. “To ask them to ‘power down’ when they’re at school is not a natural thing for them.”

Read more HERE>

Author: Wendy Hundley, Dallas News

 

 

World geography teacher Valerie Harris posed a question to her students last week at the Hebron Ninth Grade Center: “How is the Kashmir conflict more than just a religious battle?”

Instead of raising their hands to respond, this site the students quietly began typing their answers into their smartphones, viagra laptops and tablet computers arrayed on their desks. Almost immediately, and their words appeared on an interactive whiteboard at the front of the class.

Welcome to the world of digital learning.

In most classrooms in area schools, cellphones and other devices are banned so students won’t be tempted to text their friends or play games when they’re supposed to be learning. But Lewisville school district officials believe that technology is the way students learn in the 21st century.

They’re testing that theory with the Bring Your Own Technology program that encourages students to bring their personal communication devices to school.

“Our kids are so accustomed to technology, they’re digital natives from birth,” said Mark Dalton, principal of the Hebron Ninth Grade Center, which began piloting the program about eight weeks ago. “To ask them to ‘power down’ when they’re at school is not a natural thing for them.”

Read more HERE>

Author: Wendy Hundley, Dallas News

Photo by: anonymous kodomut

Proven strategies for squeezing peak productivity out of an ordinary 30-minute staff meeting.

WHAT are the barriers to raising student achievement? Ask any school leader and you will eventually hear that time and money—or rather the lack of—are among the biggest obstacles.

My staff of 30 and I meet for 30 minutes every Wednesday before school. I chose the mornings to avoid conflicts with after-school events, approved coaching obligations and extra-curricular activities. Thirty minutes may not sound like a lot of time but I have learned a few tricks—here are the best:

Create meeting norms and review and evaluate adherence regularly. Expectations should include arriving on time, listening attentively, avoiding side conversations, and sharing information in a time-conscious manner.

Align meeting topics to school improvement goals. If you want to strengthen computational fluency, for example, use staff meetings to review fluency research, provide test administration training, analyze assessment data, and fine-tune instructional strategies.

Plan staff meetings a year in advance and have a specific outcome in mind for every session. The outcomes might be a list of suggestions for improving students’ study habits, norms for grade level meetings, completed program evaluations, or an analysis of mid-year math scores. Always go into a meeting knowing exactly what you want to accomplish.

Read more strategies HERE>

Author: Cathie E. West
Proven strategies for squeezing peak productivity out of an ordinary 30-minute staff meeting.

WHAT are the barriers to raising student achievement? Ask any school leader and you will eventually hear that time and money—or rather the lack of—are among the biggest obstacles.

My staff of 30 and I meet for 30 minutes every Wednesday before school. I chose the mornings to avoid conflicts with after-school events, viagra order coaching obligations and extra-curricular activities. Thirty minutes may not sound like a lot of time but I have learned a few tricks—here are the best:

Create meeting norms and review and evaluate adherence regularly. Expectations should include arriving on time, page listening attentively, ask avoiding side conversations, and sharing information in a time-conscious manner.

Align meeting topics to school improvement goals. If you want to strengthen computational fluency, for example, use staff meetings to review fluency research, provide test administration training, analyze assessment data, and fine-tune instructional strategies.

Plan staf fmeetings a year in advance and have a specific outcome in mind for every session. The out- comes might be a list of suggestions for improving students’ study habits, norms for grade level meet- ings, completed program evaluations, or an analysis of mid-year math scores. Always go into a meeting knowing exactly what you want to accomplish.

Read more strategies HERE>

Author: Cathie E. West
 

shares proven strategies for squeezing peak productivity out of an ordinary 30-minute staff meeting.

WHAT are the barriers to raising student achievement? Ask any school leader

and you will eventually hear that time and money—or rather the lack of—are among the biggest obstacles.

Principals need extended time with teachers to make sense of assessment data, unhealthy healing puzzle out the success—or

In my book “Problem-Solving Tools and Tips for School Leaders, view ” I explain how to gain extra time by using faculty meetings for school improvement work. Teachers can be accessed every week (participation is required) and there are zero costs involved.

My staff of 30 and I meet for 30 minutes every Wednesday before school. I chose the mornings to avoid conflicts with after-school events, adiposity coaching obligations and extra-curricular activities.

Thirty minutes may not sound like a lot of time but I have learned a few tricks—here are the best:

Cathie E. West

Principal, Mountain Way Elementary Granite Falls School District cwest@gfalls.wednet.edu

failure—of instructional approaches, fine-tune action plans, and engage in professional development.

As a consequence, many school calendars are punctuated by late starts, early releases, and school closures that generate extra time for school improvement activities. This sounds promising

Create meeting norms and review and evaluate adherence regularly. Expectations should include arriving on time, listening attentively, avoiding side conversations, and sharing information in a time-conscious manner.

Align meeting topics to school improvement goals. If you want to strengthen computational fluency, for example, use staff meetings to review fluency research, provide test administration training, analyze assessment data, and fine-tune instructional strategies.

Planstaffmeetingsayearinadvanceandhavea specific outcome in mind for every session. The out- comes might be a list of suggestions for improving students’ study habits, norms for grade level meet- ings, completed program evaluations, or an analysis of mid-year math scores. Always go into a meeting knowing exactly what you want to accomplish.

Stay with a topic for as long as it takes to reach your intended outcome. If you are developing questions and rubrics for teacher interviews, for example, it might take several faculty meetings in succession to get the job done.

but unfortunately, the focus of this “extra time” is usually predetermined by district level committees, special program requirements, and the teacher contract. Opportunities for teacher-directed pursuits have become an expectation.

Author: Cathie E. West

Most of us probably remember the joys of finger painting or putting on plays from our first years of school. What we didn’t realize then was how the many benefits of art education positively impact personal growth, viagra 100mg intellectual development, and even academic achievement. However, for the past few decades, art classes have been steadily diminishing in K-12 education.

Mapping the Decline

In 2008, the Center on Educational Policy (CEP) published a report on the effects of the 2002 No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Survey data of post-NCLB elementary instruction revealed that “Forty-four percent of all districts nationwide have added time for English language arts and/or math, at the expense of social studies, science, art and music, physical education, recess, or lunch.” Although the NCLB Act identified art as a core subject, an increased emphasis on test preparation often led to time cuts.

In a 2010 survey of over 3,000 K-12 art educations, Purdue University and the National Art Education Association (NAEA) found that, “In a number of areas, art education programs have experienced significant barriers that teachers in those programs attributed to the restructuring of educational priorities brought about by NCLB. Scheduling, workloads, and funding were areas of the most pronounced negative impact for NCLB on art education programs.”

Since the days of NCLB, the state of American art education has not seen any significant improvements. Last March, President Obama announced significant cuts to art programs. According to the Los Angeles Times, “Federal funding totaling $40 million for the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ educational programs, arts education grants for the disabled, and grants to train arts teachers are just some of the arts-related programs on the chopping block as Congress and the Obama administration wrangle over how much to cut the 2010-11 federal budget.”

Read more HERE>

Source: Eye on Education

 
Most of us probably remember the joys of finger painting or putting on plays from our first years of school. What we didn’t realize then was how the many benefits of arts education positively impact personal growth, search sick intellectual development, information pills and even academic achievement. However, for the past few decades, art classes have been steadily diminishing in K-12 education.

Mapping the Decline

In 2008, the Center on Educational Policy (CEP) published a report on the effects of the 2002 No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Survey data of post-NCLB elementary instruction revealed that “Forty-four percent of all districts nationwide have added time for English language arts and/or math, at the expense of social studies, science, art and music, physical education, recess, or lunch.” Although the NCLB Act identified art as a core subject, an increased emphasis on test preparation often led to time cuts.

In a 2010 survey of over 3,000 K-12 art educations, Purdue University and the National Art Education Association (NAEA) found that “In a number of areas, art education programs have experienced significant barriers that teachers in those programs attributed to the restructuring of educational priorities brought about by NCLB. Scheduling, workloads, and funding were areas of the most pronounced negative impact for NCLB on art education programs.”

Since the days of NCLB, the state of American art education has not seen any significant improvements. Last March, President Obama announced significant cuts to art programs. According to the Los Angeles Times, “Federal funding totaling $40 million for the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ educational programs, arts education grants for the disabled, and grants to train arts teachers are just some of the arts-related programs on the chopping block as Congress and the Obama administration wrangle over how much to cut the 2010-11 federal budget.”

Read more HERE>

 

Have you ever heard anyone say, viagra 60mg “Why do teachers need continuing education… didn’t they go to college?” While it is true that teachers attend college and earn degrees, it is also true that nourishing the ongoing professional growth of teachers is critical to ensure that the best and brightest reach our most precious commodity—our youth.

Teachers are challenged to teach all students, regardless of their ability levels. They are asked to differentiate their teaching approaches to accommodate each student’s learning style. As a parent, accommodating my two children each day to ensure that their needs were met was consuming. Why do we expect teachers to design effective lesson plans aligned to state standards, ready their students for statewide assessments, manage elementary and adolescent behavior, understand and use data to make informed decisions, keep the lines of communication open with parents, and deliver instruction that engages students and improves achievement from the first day on the job and without sustained support?

Read more HERE>

Author: Ellen Eisenberg, Eye on Education