How to Prevent Summer Reading Loss

Posted on July 07, 2011

To cut crime, viagra buy raise education and income levels, dosage and reduce addiction rates among the poor, look no program offers more bang for the buck than preschool, as a new study published in Science demonstrates.

The long-term study followed 1,539 children born in 1979-80. They lived in the lowest-income neighborhoods of Chicago, where nearly 40% of residents live below the poverty line; most of the children were African American. More than 950 of the families in the study participated in Chicago’s Child-Parent Center Education Program, the second oldest federally funded preschool program in the country, which focuses on school-readiness, including listening skills and math and reading preparation. The kids who attended preschool started at age 3-4. Their parents were actively involved in the program. The rest of the kids in the study did not attend preschool but participated in full-day kindergarten.

After tracking the children to age 28, researchers found that those who had attended preschool were 28% less likely to develop alcohol or other drug problems or to wind up in jail or prison in adulthood, compared with kids who did not go to preschool. What’s more, their odds of being arrested for a felony were cut by 22% and they were 24% more likely to attend a four-year college. Incomes in adulthood of those who attended preschool ere also higher than those for the children who did not.

Read more HERE>

Author: Maia Szalavitz
Can something really be good and bad at the same time? How about that delicious but fattening dinner you had last week? It was great, ask until you added up the calories, ailment right? Now what about a school? Can it be both good and bad at the same time? Is educational quality—like beauty—in the eye of the beholder or do test scores say it all?

More precisely, can a school with only 18% of its 4th graders at grade level in reading be considered a good school? Before you say, “Of course not,” please read on. Because we discovered that the FIRST graders at that school were reading confidently and competently. That’s right: the first graders were readers, but the fourth graders weren’t according to the results of the state test. Is this a paradox, or a full-blown contradiction?

As a starting point, producer Cat McGrath and I decided to see if we could get into some schools with terrible reading scores. While a couple of principals turned us down, the principal of PS 1 in the South Bronx in New York City, said, “Come on up. We are a great school.” “Yeah, right,” we thought. After all, we had the scores in front of us: not even 18% of the school’s 4th graders were competent readers.

We went up to that high-poverty neighborhood, where crime scene tapes proliferate and unemployed men linger on street corners. PS 1 fits right in. It is grim looking from the outside, a fortress-like building with few windows. Inside is different, however. The classrooms and corridors of PS 1 are bright and full of energy, with student work displayed everywhere. Jorge Perdomo, who’s led the school for five years, took us to his first grade classes. ”Our first graders are reading,” he claimed, “and writing too,” pointing to their papers on classroom walls. We did. We saw veteran and rookie teachers giving their first graders a strong (and essential) foundation in phonics. First graders were learning that letters make sounds, that combinations of letters make different sounds, and that, when letters are strung together, they can make words. They were decoding. Why the paradox?

Read More HERE>

Author: John Merrow

 
Can something really be good and bad at the same time? How about that delicious but fattening dinner you had last week? It was great, store until you added up the calories, pill right? Now what about a school? Can it be both good and bad at the same time? Is educational quality — like beauty — in the eye of the beholder or do test scores say it all?

More precisely, link can a school with only 18% of its 4th graders at grade level in reading be considered a good school? Before you say, “Of course not,” please read on. Because we discovered that the FIRST graders at that school were reading confidently and competently. That’s right: the first graders were readers, but the fourth graders weren’t according to the results of the state test. Is this a paradox, or a full-blown contradiction?

As a starting point, producer Cat McGrath and I decided to see if we could get into some schools with terrible reading scores. While a couple of principals turned us down, the principal of PS 1 in the South Bronx in New York City, said, “Come on up. We are a great school.” “Yeah, right,” we thought. After all, we had the scores in front of us: not even 18% of the school’s 4th graders were competent readers.

We went up to that high-poverty neighborhood, where crime scene tapes proliferate and unemployed men linger on street corners. PS 1 fits right in. It is grim looking from the outside, a fortress-like building with few windows. Inside is different, however. The classrooms and corridors of PS 1 are bright and full of energy, with student work displayed everywhere. Jorge Perdomo, who’s led the school for five years, took us to his first grade classes. ”Our first graders are reading,” he claimed, “and writing too,” pointing to their papers on classroom walls. We did. We saw veteran and rookie teachers giving their first graders a strong (and essential) foundation in phonics. First graders were learning that letters make sounds, that combinations of letters make different sounds, and that, when letters are strung together, they can make words. They were decoding.

Read More HERE>

Author: John Merrow

 
Can something really be good and bad at the same time? How about that delicious but fattening dinner you had last week? It was great, medical until you added up the calories, right? Now what about a school? Can it be both good and bad at the same time? Is educational quality—like beauty—in the eye of the beholder or do test scores say it all?

More precisely, can a school with only 18% of its 4th graders at grade level in reading be considered a good school? Before you say, “Of course not,” please read on. Because we discovered that the FIRST graders at that school were reading confidently and competently. That’s right: the first graders were readers, but the fourth graders weren’t according to the results of the state test. Is this a paradox, or a full-blown contradiction?

As a starting point, producer Cat McGrath and I decided to see if we could get into some schools with terrible reading scores. While a couple of principals turned us down, the principal of PS 1 in the South Bronx in New York City, said, “Come on up. We are a great school.” “Yeah, right,” we thought. After all, we had the scores in front of us: not even 18% of the school’s 4th graders were competent readers.

We went up to that high-poverty neighborhood, where crime scene tapes proliferate and unemployed men linger on street corners. PS 1 fits right in. It is grim looking from the outside, a fortress-like building with few windows. Inside is different, however. The classrooms and corridors of PS 1 are bright and full of energy, with student work displayed everywhere. Jorge Perdomo, who’s led the school for five years, took us to his first grade classes. ”Our first graders are reading,” he claimed, “and writing too,” pointing to their papers on classroom walls. We did. We saw veteran and rookie teachers giving their first graders a strong (and essential) foundation in phonics. First graders were learning that letters make sounds, that combinations of letters make different sounds, and that, when letters are strung together, they can make words. They were decoding. Why the paradox?

Read More HERE>

Author: John Merrow

 

Whenever summer approaches, more about I always think about the summer reading gap that will affect so many of our struggling students. Most U.S. students go to school for nine months each year. Most grow in their knowledge and skills during this time. When summer comes along, check however, many students, particularly those from low–socioeconomic families, experience summer learning loss.

Research indicates that struggling learners score significantly higher on standardized tests taken at the beginning of summer vacation than they do on the same standardized tests taken at summer’s end. This loss is particularly evident in reading, and it is most pronounced among students from low-socioeconomic families, who may not have access to books.

Various terms have been used to refer to what happens when students are out of school during the summer months: “summer reading gap,” “summer learning loss,” “summer setback,” “summer shortfall,” and “summer slide.” Regardless of which term is used, the research clearly shows that summer learning loss contributes to the perpetuation of the reading gap between students from low-socioeconomic and high-socioeconomic families.

Losses are large and cumulative; read more HERE>

AuthorLinda B. Gambrell, Eugene T. Moore School of Education at Clemson University,