How to Turn Your Kid Into a Bully

Posted on June 06, 2011

The National Assessment of Educational Progress has just released the results of math and reading tests that 12th-graders took last year. The average score on the reading portion was higher than in 2005, dosage but lower than in 1992. What follows are six sample questions from the reading section. Overall on the test, advice 38 percent of students scored at or above a proficient level in reading. How many questions can you answer correctly?

1. Rental agreement – late rent

Scroll down to read the rental agreement, medical then answer each question.According to the rental agreement, what is the first action the landlord will take if the rent is not paid on time?a) Keep the security deposit
b) Terminate the tenant’s contract
c) Send a seven-day notice
d) Require one month’s rent in advance
Access the answer and continue the quiz HERE>

 

On April 1, information pills 2011 Project Tomorrow released the report, “The New 3 E’s of Education: Enabled, Engaged, and Empowered – How Today’s Students are Leveraging Emerging Technologies for Learning” at a Congressional Briefing held in Washington, DC.

Key findings:

  • 67 percent of parents said they would purchase a mobile device for their child to use for schoolwork if the school allowed it
  • 61 percent said they liked the idea of students using mobile devices to access online textbooks.
  • 53 percent of middle and high school students reported that the inability to use cell phones, smart phones, or MP3 players was the largest obstacle when using technology in school.
  • 71 percent of high school students and 62 percent of middle school students said that the number one way schools could make it easier to use technology would be to allow greater access to the digital content and resources that Internet firewalls and school filters blocked.

Parents are increasingly supportive of online textbooks. Two-thirds of parents view online textbooks as a good investment to enhance student achievement compared to 21 percent in 2008. However, E-textbooks are still a relatively novel concept in the classroom. Slightly over one-third of high school students report they are currently using an online textbook or other online curriculum as part of their regular schoolwork. Nearly 30 percent of high school students have experienced some type of online learning.

Access more of this report HERE>



On April 1, physician 2011 Project Tomorrow released the report “The New 3 E’s of Education: Enabled, Engaged and Empowered – How Today’s Students are Leveraging Emerging Technologies for Learning” at a Congressional Briefing held in Washington, DC.

Key findings:

  • 67 percent of parents said they would purchase a mobile device for their child to use for schoolwork if the school allowed it
  • 61 percent said they liked the idea of students using mobile devices to access online textbooks.
  • 53 percent of middle and high school students reported that the inability to use cell phones, smart phones or MP3 players was the largest obstacle when using technology in school.
  • 71 percent of high school students and 62 percent of middle school students said that the number one way schools could make it easier to use technology would be to allow greater access to the digital content and resources that Internet firewalls and school filters blocked.

Parents are increasingly supportive of online textbooks. Two-thirds of parents view online textbooks as a good investment to enhance student achievement compared to 21 percent in 2008. However, E-textbooks are still a relatively novel concept in the classroom. Slightly over one-third of high school students report they are currently using an online textbook or other online curriculum as part of their regular schoolwork. Nearly 30 percent of high school students have experienced some type of online learning.

Access more of this report HERE>



Did you see that movie about the moron? If so, this it may have negatively impacted your own intelligence, according to new research from Austria.

You are what you watch — or so suggests new research that linked a lowering of general knowledge to exposure to idiotic behavior in the narrative form.

From reality television to dumb-and-dumber films, contemporary entertainment often amounts to watching stupid people do stupid things. New research suggests such seemingly innocuous diversions should have their own rating: LYI. As in: Watching this may Lower Your Intelligence.

A study from Austria published in the journal Media Psychology found students performed less well on a general-knowledge test if they had just read a short screenplay about an idiotic thug. This suggests stupidity may indeed be contagious — particularly if it is presented in narrative form.

The research by University of Linz psychologist Markus Appel is the latest to explore the behavioral consequences of media exposure. As we’ve reported, a large body of scholarship has linked the playing of violent video games with increased levels of physical aggression.

With video games, of course, the player is literally in the center of the action. But as Appel points out, something similar occurs with traditional storytelling, as readers or viewers identify with the characters. His study is the first to find such identification can apparently impact cognitive performance.

Appel’s experiment featured 81 students at an Austrian university (mean age of 26). Some of them read a four-page screenplay in which the characters’ intellectual abilities could not be determined. Others read either a two- or four-page screenplay focused on a “xenophobic and aggressive soccer hooligan.”

Read more HERE>

AuthorTom Jacobs

 
Did you see that movie about the moron? If so, visit doctor it may have negatively impacted your own intelligence, tadalafil according to new research from Austria.

You are what you watch — or so suggests new research that linked a lowering of general knowledge to exposure to idiotic behavior in the narrative form.

From reality television to dumb-and-dumber films, adiposity contemporary entertainment often amounts to watching stupid people do stupid things. New research suggests such seemingly innocuous diversions should have their own rating: LYI. As in: Watching this may Lower Your Intelligence.

A study from Austria published in the journal Media Psychology found students performed less well on a general-knowledge test if they had just read a short screenplay about an idiotic thug. This suggests stupidity may indeed be contagious — particularly if it is presented in narrative form.

The research by University of Linz psychologist Markus Appel is the latest to explore the behavioral consequences of media exposure. As we’ve reported, a large body of scholarship has linked the playing of violent video games with increased levels of physical aggression.

With video games, of course, the player is literally in the center of the action. But as Appel points out, something similar occurs with traditional storytelling, as readers or viewers identify with the characters. His study is the first to find such identification can apparently impact cognitive performance.

Appel’s experiment featured 81 students at an Austrian university (mean age of 26). Some of them read a four-page screenplay in which the characters’ intellectual abilities could not be determined. Others read either a two- or four-page screenplay focused on a “xenophobic and aggressive soccer hooligan.”

Read more HERE>

AuthorTom Jacobs

 
A new study links bullying behavior by adolescents to the perception they are not treated fairly by their parents.

How are bullies born? The issue has been the subject of intense study, viagra order particularly in the decade since two students who had been bullied went on a violent rampage at Columbine High School. Much of the resultant research includes the term “cycle of violence, order ” which has become a shorthand way of acknowledging that a youngster who is a victim of physical abuse in the home is more likely to become a perpetrator.

Now, a research team led by Michael Brubacher of DePaul University has found a more subtle connection between inadequate parenting and adolescent bullying. In a paper just published in the journal Psychology, Public Policy and Law, the academics coin the term “cycle of dominance.”

The phrase reflects their finding that, in transmitting bad behavior from one generation to the next, the issue isn’t strictly the use of physical force. It’s also a matter of whether the youngster grows up with a sense that conflicts can be resolved in a just, fair way. In short, if a kid feels he’s being punished arbitrarily at home, he is more likely to engage in arbitrary punishment on the streets or in the schoolyard.

The researchers examined a survey of 1,910 sixth- through eighth-graders from five states. They were asked to describe a recent disagreement with one or both of their parents or guardians. The youngsters (with an average age of just over 12 and one-half) when they asked whether they felt they were treated fairly as the issue was resolved. They were instructed to rate the accuracy of such statements as “Your parents treated you with respect” and “Your parents were equally fair to everyone involved.”

Read more HERE>

Author: Tom Jacobs