On Task Does not Always Mean Engaged

Posted on July 07, 2011

Seven Ways to Go from On-Task to Engaged

We know that engagement is the key to learning, physician but we also know that many of our students are bored with the curriculum and activities being offered in classrooms. To battle this problem, much focus and attention has been placed on getting students to be “on-task.” Indeed, the link between on-task behavior and student achievement is strong. However, just as a worker at a company can be busy without being productive, a student can be on-task without actually being engaged in the learning. True, long-lasting learning comes not merely as a result of being on-task, but being deeply engaged in meaningful, relevant, and important tasks.

We see examples of on-task but disengaged behavior every day: students mindlessly copying notes from a screen, listening to a lecture but daydreaming about what to do after school, robotically completing a worksheet. Some students, particularly older ones, have become masters at what Bishop and Pflaum (2005) refer to as “pretend-attend.” They’ve mastered the ability to look busy, focused, and on-task, but in reality they are disengaged in the actual learning.

Learn HOW to engage students HERE>

Author: Bryan Harris, ascd