New Teachers Seek Support Online

Posted on January 01, 2012

Starting this fall, about it visit this site hospital wandering will be added to the list of descriptors doctors can use to diagnose individuals with autism, approved intellectual disability and other conditions. The addition comes after a federal committee gave the final go-ahead on a proposal to make wandering a secondary classification that could be applied to individuals with developmental disabilities or other diagnoses.

“The proposed code is really intended to promote better data collection and understanding of this behavior,” Coleen Boyle, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities told a meeting of the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee on Tuesday.

Boyle said that more than 6,000 public comments pored in earlier this year in response to the proposal to add wandering to the diagnostic coding system clinicians use, which is known as the International Classification of Diseases, or ICD-9-CM.

Author: Michelle Diament, disabilityscoop.com

Read more HERE>
Starting this fall, approved wandering will be added to the list of descriptors doctors can use to diagnose individuals with autism, stuff intellectual disability and other conditions. The addition comes after a federal committee gave the final go-ahead on a proposal to make wandering a secondary classification that could be applied to individuals with developmental disabilities or other diagnoses.

“The proposed code is really intended to promote better data collection and understanding of this behavior, pill ” Coleen Boyle, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities told a meeting of the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee on Tuesday.

Boyle said that more than 6,000 public comments pored in earlier this year in response to the proposal to add wandering to the diagnostic coding system clinicians use, which is known as the International Classification of Diseases, or ICD-9-CM.

Author: Michelle Diament, disabilityscoop.com

Read more HERE>

Lawmakers Push For Full Funding Of IDEA

By MICHELLE DIAMENT

July 22, medications 2011 Text Size A A

A group of U.S. senators wants the federal government to fully fund special education for the first time ever and they’re proposing that higher cigarette taxes are the way to pay for it.

Under a bill introduced this week, see the lawmakers hope to fulfill a commitment dating back to 1975 when the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act was enacted ensuring the right to a free and appropriate education for children with disabilities.

At that time, see Congress committed to pay 40 percent of the cost of special education. But the federal government has never met its initial goal and today foots just 16.1 percent of the bill. States and school districts are left to pick up the rest of the tab.

That would change under the bill introduced this week by U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa. The legislation calls for the federal government to gradually pay more of the costs associated with IDEA, ultimately taking responsibility for the 40 percent share by 2021.

Author: Michelle Diament, disabilityscoop.com

Read more HERE>
Lawmakers Push For Full Funding Of IDEA

By MICHELLE DIAMENT

July 22, hospital 2011 Text Size A A

A group of U.S. senators wants the federal government to fully fund special education for the first time ever and they’re proposing that higher cigarette taxes are the way to pay for it.

Under a bill introduced this week, price the lawmakers hope to fulfill a commitment dating back to 1975 when the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act was enacted ensuring the right to a free and appropriate education for children with disabilities.

At that time, Congress committed to pay 40 percent of the cost of special education. But the federal government has never met its initial goal and today foots just 16.1 percent of the bill. States and school districts are left to pick up the rest of the tab.

That would change under the bill introduced this week by U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa. The legislation calls for the federal government to gradually pay more of the costs associated with IDEA, ultimately taking responsibility for the 40 percent share by 2021.

Author: Michelle Diament, disabilityscoop.com

Read more HERE>

How do new (and not so new) instructional coaches get into teachers’ classrooms and schedules? That question was posed to me when I recently worked with the 11th cadre of elementary reading coaches at Hillsborough County, more about Tampa, doctor Florida. The members of this class were completing their year long training program with a summer reading camp and daily opportunities to work with teachers and each other. They are completing interviews and getting assigned to buildings. In a few short weeks they will be meeting administrators and faculties, about it anxious to dive into coaching practices.

Here are some options we explored for introducing observation and feedback for teacher growth and student success:

Technical Coaching

When coaches provide professional development on teaching strategies, the expectation of coaching follow up should be built into the workshop session. Coaches modeling an instructional strategy in the teacher’s classroom should provide the teacher with an observation tool focused on teacher and student actions reflective of the strategy. When the teacher reviews the findings with the coach, the opportunity for the coach to observe the teacher with the same tool can emerge in the conversation.

Collegial Coaching

Challenge Coaching

Author: Steve Barkley

Read more HERE>

 

 
How do new (and not so new) instructional coaches get into teachers’ classrooms and schedules? That question was posed to me when I recently worked with the 11th cadre of elementary reading coaches at Hillsborough County, purchase order Tampa, viagra Florida. The members of this class were completing their year long training program with a summer reading camp and daily opportunities to work with teachers and each other. They are completing interviews and getting assigned to buildings. In a few short weeks they will be meeting administrators and faculties, stomach anxious to dive into coaching practices.

Here are some options we explored for introducing observation and feedback for teacher growth and student success:

Technical Coaching

When coaches provide professional development on teaching strategies, the expectation of coaching follow up should be built into the workshop session. Coaches modeling an instructional strategy in the teacher’s classroom should provide the teacher with an observation tool focused on teacher and student actions reflective of the strategy. When the teacher reviews the findings with the coach, the opportunity for the coach to observe the teacher with the same tool can emerge in the conversation.

Collegial Coaching

Challenge Coaching

Author: Steve Barkley

Read more HERE>

 

 

Released in conjunction with the July 18 White House Roundtable on Education with Business Leaders, ampoule new data from the Alliance for Excellent Education reveals that high school graduates earn a national average of $8, visit web 000 more annually compared to high school dropouts.

The state-by-state data shows the average annual incomes in every state for high school dropouts, clinic high school graduates, individuals with associate’s degrees, and bachelor degree recipients. The increased benefits for earning a high school diploma vary from $13,046 in Alaska to $5,339 in Arkansas. The average annual earnings by educational attainment for individuals in the District of Columbia is in the graph to the right.

“Diplomas mean dollars,” said roundtable attendee Bob Wise, president of the Alliance for Excellent Education and former governor of West Virginia. “Graduating more students from high school who are prepared for college is good for the individuals in terms of higher earnings, but it also benefits the nation in terms of increased tax revenue, additional spending on homes and automobiles, job creation, and a more robust economic growth.”

Not only do high school graduates earn more than high school dropouts, they are also more likely to be employed. According to June 2011 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for high school graduates was 10 percent, compared to 14.3 percent for dropouts. College graduates, with an unemployment rate of 4.4 percent, fare even better.

A table with the annual income difference by educational attainment for every state is available at http://www.all4ed.org/files/July18Econ.pdf.

Source: Alliance for Excellent Education

Read more HERE>
Released in conjunction with the July 18 White House Roundtable on Education with Business Leaders, treat new data from the Alliance for Excellent Education reveals that high school graduates earn a national average of $8, cheap 000 more annually compared to high school dropouts.

The state-by-state data shows the average annual incomes in every state for high school dropouts, buy information pills high school graduates, individuals with associate’s degrees, and bachelor degree recipients. The increased benefits for earning a high school diploma vary from $13,046 in Alaska to $5,339 in Arkansas. The average annual earnings by educational attainment for individuals in the District of Columbia is in the graph to the right.

“Diplomas mean dollars,” said roundtable attendee Bob Wise, president of the Alliance for Excellent Education and former governor of West Virginia. “Graduating more students from high school who are prepared for college is good for the individuals in terms of higher earnings, but it also benefits the nation in terms of increased tax revenue, additional spending on homes and automobiles, job creation, and a more robust economic growth.”

Not only do high school graduates earn more than high school dropouts, they are also more likely to be employed. According to June 2011 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for high school graduates was 10 percent, compared to 14.3 percent for dropouts. College graduates, with an unemployment rate of 4.4 percent, fare even better.

A table with the annual income difference by educational attainment for every state is available at http://www.all4ed.org/files/July18Econ.pdf.

Source: Alliance for Excellent Education

Read more HERE>

Released in conjunction with the July 18 White House Roundtable on Education with Business Leaders, information pills new data from the Alliance for Excellent Education reveals that high school graduates earn a national average of $8,000 more annually compared to high school dropouts.

The state-by-state data shows the average annual incomes in every state for high school dropouts, high school graduates, individuals with associate’s degrees, and bachelor degree recipients. The increased benefits for earning a high school diploma vary from $13,046 in Alaska to $5,339 in Arkansas. The average annual earnings by educational attainment for individuals in the District of Columbia is in the graph to the right.

“Diplomas mean dollars,” said roundtable attendee Bob Wise, president of the Alliance for Excellent Education and former governor of West Virginia. “Graduating more students from high school who are prepared for college is good for the individuals in terms of higher earnings, but it also benefits the nation in terms of increased tax revenue, additional spending on homes and automobiles, job creation, and a more robust economic growth.”

Not only do high school graduates earn more than high school dropouts, they are also more likely to be employed. According to June 2011 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for high school graduates was 10 percent, compared to 14.3 percent for dropouts. College graduates, with an unemployment rate of 4.4 percent, fare even better.

A table with the annual income difference by educational attainment for every state is available at http://www.all4ed.org/files/July18Econ.pdf.

Source: Alliance for Excellent Education

Read more HERE>
Released in conjunction with the July 18 White House Roundtable on Education with Business Leaders, approved new data from the Alliance for Excellent Education reveals that high school graduates earn a national average of $8, discount 000 more annually compared to high school dropouts.

The state-by-state data shows the average annual incomes in every state for high school dropouts, high school graduates, individuals with associate’s degrees, and bachelor degree recipients. The increased benefits for earning a high school diploma vary from $13,046 in Alaska to $5,339 in Arkansas. The average annual earnings by educational attainment for individuals in the District of Columbia is in the graph to the right.

“Diplomas mean dollars,” said roundtable attendee Bob Wise, president of the Alliance for Excellent Education and former governor of West Virginia. “Graduating more students from high school who are prepared for college is good for the individuals in terms of higher earnings, but it also benefits the nation in terms of increased tax revenue, additional spending on homes and automobiles, job creation, and a more robust economic growth.”

Not only do high school graduates earn more than high school dropouts, they are also more likely to be employed. According to June 2011 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for high school graduates was 10 percent, compared to 14.3 percent for dropouts. College graduates, with an unemployment rate of 4.4 percent, fare even better.

A table with the annual income difference by educational attainment for every state is available at http://www.all4ed.org/files/July18Econ.pdf.

Source: Alliance for Excellent Education

Read more HERE>

Nearly six in ten public school students were suspended or expelled at least once between their seventh- and twelfth-grade school years, what is ed according to a new study of nearly one million Texas public secondary school students released by the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center in partnership with the Public Policy Research Institute of Texas A&M University. The report, more about Breaking Schools’ Rules: A Statewide Study of How School Discipline Relates to Students’ Success and Juvenile Justice Involvement, also finds that disciplinary actions had a significant impact on whether a student graduated from high school.

Students with disciplinary actions were five times more likely to drop out (10 percent) than students with no disciplinary action (2 percent). Additionally, students with disciplinary actions were more than six times more likely (31 percent) to be held back at least once, compared to students without (5 percent). The report also finds that nearly 60 percent of students who were disciplined eleven times or more did not graduate from high school during the study period.

Of the students studied, approximately 70 percent who were followed for up to three years after their expected completion of high school either graduated or received a General Education Diploma (GED). Of the 30 percent of students who left school, 6.7 percent were formally identified as dropouts. Other reasons for leaving school prior to graduation were enrollment in an out-of-state school (41 percent), home schooling (23 percent), private school (14 percent), or return to a home country (17 percent).

Source: Alliance for Excellent Education

Read more HERE>

 
Nearly six in ten public school students were suspended or expelled at least once between their seventh- and twelfth-grade school years, seek according to a new study of nearly one million Texas public secondary school students released by the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center in partnership with the Public Policy Research Institute of Texas A&M University. The report, sildenafil Breaking Schools’ Rules: A Statewide Study of How School Discipline Relates to Students’ Success and Juvenile Justice Involvement, purchase also finds that disciplinary actions had a significant impact on whether a student graduated from high school.

Students with disciplinary actions were five times more likely to drop out (10 percent) than students with no disciplinary action (2 percent). Additionally, students with disciplinary actions were more than six times more likely (31 percent) to be held back at least once, compared to students without (5 percent). The report also finds that nearly 60 percent of students who were disciplined eleven times or more did not graduate from high school during the study period.

Of the students studied, approximately 70 percent who were followed for up to three years after their expected completion of high school either graduated or received a General Education Diploma (GED). Of the 30 percent of students who left school, 6.7 percent were formally identified as dropouts. Other reasons for leaving school prior to graduation were enrollment in an out-of-state school (41 percent), home schooling (23 percent), private school (14 percent), or return to a home country (17 percent).

Source: Alliance for Excellent Education

Read more HERE>

 

Protests Mark ADA Anniversary

On the 21st anniversary of a law that dramatically expanded disability rights, pill advocates are demonstrating across the country against a proposal that would set guidelines on when workers with disabilities can be paid less than minimum wage.

Members of the National Federation of the Blind are holding “informational protests” outside the district offices of members of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Tuesday.

The actions coincide with the 21st anniversary of the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which greatly increased the rights of people with disabilities and ensured broad accessibility.

Tuesday’s events are designed to urge senators to reject a proposal that would outline the circumstances under which people with disabilities could be employed at less than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, organizers say.

“Unequal pay for equal work on the basis of disability is unfair, discriminatory and immoral,” said Marc Maurer, president of the National Federation of the Blind.

The Senate committee is expected to consider the proposal covering so-called subminimum wage next week as part of a reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act.

Despite significant criticism from some disability advocates, others say that the proposal would offer needed protections for a system of sheltered workshop employment that currently has little oversight.

Author: Michelle Diament, disabilityscoop.com

Read more HERE>
Protests Mark ADA Anniversary

 

On the 21st anniversary of a law that dramatically expanded disability rights, health advocates are demonstrating across the country against a proposal that would set guidelines on when workers with disabilities can be paid less than minimum wage.

Members of the National Federation of the Blind are holding “informational protests” outside the district offices of members of the Senate Health, check Education, visit this site Labor and Pensions Committee on Tuesday.

The actions coincide with the 21st anniversary of the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which greatly increased the rights of people with disabilities and ensured broad accessibility.

Tuesday’s events are designed to urge senators to reject a proposal that would outline the circumstances under which people with disabilities could be employed at less than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, organizers say.

“Unequal pay for equal work on the basis of disability is unfair, discriminatory and immoral,” said Marc Maurer, president of the National Federation of the Blind.

The Senate committee is expected to consider the proposal covering so-called subminimum wage next week as part of a reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act.

Despite significant criticism from some disability advocates, others say that the proposal would offer needed protections for a system of sheltered workshop employment that currently has little oversight.

Author: Michelle Diament, disabilityscoop.com

Read more HERE>

Noah Rahman has moderate Cerebral Palsy affecting his communication, doctor cognition and upper and lower body movement. When he turned two, his language, cognitive abilitity and fine motor skills were diagnosed by a developmental specialist as being at least 12 months behind. Then Noah got an iPad.

Four months later, his language and cognition were on par with his age level. His fine motor skills had made significant leaps. Today, the three-year-old spends an hour or two on his iPad each day. He switches his apps between reading and writing in English, Arabic and Spanish. In the fall, he’ll enter a classroom of five-year-olds. “The iPad unlocked his motivation and his desire because it’s fun,” says his dad Sami Rahman, co-founder of SNApps4Kids, a community of parents, therapists and educators sharing their experiences using the iPad, iPod touch, iPhone and Android to help children with special needs.

SNApps4Kids taps into a burgeoning trend for people with disabilities. Touch devices — most notably the iPad — are revolutionizing the lives of children, adults and seniors with special needs. Rahman estimates some 40,000 apps have been developed for this demographic.

1. As a communication Tool

2. As a Therapeutic Device

3. As an educational tool

4. as a misbehavior monitor

Author: Zoe Fox, mashable.com

Read more HERE>
Noah Rahman has moderate Cerebral Palsy affecting his communication, site cognition and upper and lower body movement. When he turned two, sale his language, cognitive abilitity and fine motor skills were diagnosed by a developmental specialist as being at least 12 months behind. Then Noah got an iPad.

 

Four months later, his language and cognition were on par with his age level. His fine motor skills had made significant leaps.

Today, the three-year-old (pictured at right with his father) spends an hour or two on his iPad each day. He switches his apps between reading and writing in English, Arabic and Spanish. In the fall, he’ll enter a classroom of five-year-olds. “The iPad unlocked his motivation and his desire because it’s fun,” says his dad Sami Rahman, co-founder of SNApps4Kids, a community of parents, therapists and educators sharing their experiences using the iPad, iPod touch, iPhone and Android to help children with special needs.

SNApps4Kids taps into a burgeoning trend for people with disabilities. Touch devices — most notably the iPad — are revolutionizing the lives of children, adults and seniors with special needs. Rahman estimates some 40,000 apps have been developed for this demographic.

 

Author: Zoe Fox, mashable.com

Read more HERE>
If you’re a new teacher in your first classroom, ailment a little advice from a veteran educator goes a long way.

For those who can’t get face-to-face mentoring time, buy more about online mentoring can be a big help, says Alyson Mike, director of online professional development at the New Teacher Center, a nonprofit based in Santa Cruz, CA. The New Teacher Center’s largest endeavor is called e-Mentoring for Student Success (eMSS), a year-long, nationwide mentoring program that pairs novice science, math, and special education teachers with those with experience. Begun in 2002 through a grant from the National Science Foundation, the program offers new teachers constant interactivity with a content-specific mentor as well as research-based curricula. Often, eMSS clients are school districts or departments of education who want to offer more professional development opportunities to their beginning teachers in an effort to bolster AYP scores or new-teacher retention rates.

For educators looking for online mentoring programs, take a look at these:

  • Illinois New Teacher Collaborative-Online
  • WINGS (Welcoming Interns and Novices with Guidance and Support)
  • ENDAPT (Electronic Networking to Develop Accomplished Professional Teachers)
  • PACT (Performance-based Academic Coaching Team)
  • UWeb Teacher Support Network

So, why online mentoring as opposed to face-to-face? Wouldn’t it be better if all beginning teachers could have in-person mentor relationships?

Author: Sara Bernard, kued.org

Read more HERE>