One-on-One Speech Therapy Goes Digital

Posted on December 12, 2011
Bill Gates and Salman Khan discuss the 'flipped classroom' at TED 2011

Bill Gates and Salman Khan discuss the 'flipped classroom' | photo by Flickr user jurvetson

How YouTube Is Changing The Classroom

Troy Cockrum, pharmacy an English teacher at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic school, unhealthy helps a student having computer issues. Cockrum “flipped” his classroom this year, and painted the walls of his classroom with tech-savvy terminology to reflect the new change.

As long as there have been teachers, they’ve battled the same problems: How can they reach students of multiple ability levels at once, cover more course material in limited time, and find more time to engage with students one-on-one?

Some educators think they’ve found a solution to all three problems in, of all things, YouTube.

A small group of teachers nationwide is replacing in-class lectures with short online videos students watch at home. This flip-flop of homework and lecture — from which the model gets its name, “the flipped classroom” — leaves class time open for students to complete their assignments with their teacher standing by to offer one-on-one help.

Research backing the model is scarce, and some critics have dismissed the model as a gimmick. Still, a handful Indiana teachers — and top state education officials — are willing to give it a try.

“Several teachers I’ve talked to say they’ve run into the same problem: If you’re not prepared for it, you run out of stuff to do, because you’ve never been able to deliver that much content in a year.“

Author: Kyle Stokes, Stateimpactindiana

Read more HERE>

 
How YouTube Is Changing The Classroom

Troy Cockrum, this site an English teacher at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic school, helps a student having computer issues. Cockrum “flipped” his classroom this year, and painted the walls of his classroom with tech-savvy terminology to reflect the new change.

As long as there have been teachers, they’ve battled the same problems: How can they reach students of multiple ability levels at once, cover more course material in limited time, and find more time to engage with students one-on-one?

Some educators think they’ve found a solution to all three problems in, of all things, YouTube.

A small group of teachers nationwide is replacing in-class lectures with short online videos students watch at home. This flip-flop of homework and lecture — from which the model gets its name, “the flipped classroom” — leaves class time open for students to complete their assignments with their teacher standing by to offer one-on-one help.

Research backing the model is scarce, and some critics have dismissed the model as a gimmick. Still, a handful Indiana teachers — and top state education officials — are willing to give it a try.

“Several teachers I’ve talked to say they’ve run into the same problem: If you’re not prepared for it, you run out of stuff to do, because you’ve never been able to deliver that much content in a year.“

Author: Kyle Stokes, Stateimpactindiana

Read more HERE>

 
How YouTube Is Changing The Classroom

Troy Cockrum, find rx an English teacher at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic school, more about information pills helps a student having computer issues. Cockrum “flipped” his classroom this year, shop and painted the walls of his classroom with tech-savvy terminology to reflect the new change.

As long as there have been teachers, they’ve battled the same problems: How can they reach students of multiple ability levels at once, cover more course material in limited time, and find more time to engage with students one-on-one?

Some educators think they’ve found a solution to all three problems in, of all things, YouTube.

A small group of teachers nationwide is replacing in-class lectures with short online videos students watch at home. This flip-flop of homework and lecture — from which the model gets its name, “the flipped classroom” — leaves class time open for students to complete their assignments with their teacher standing by to offer one-on-one help.

Research backing the model is scarce, and some critics have dismissed the model as a gimmick. Still, a handful Indiana teachers — and top state education officials — are willing to give it a try.

“Several teachers I’ve talked to say they’ve run into the same problem: If you’re not prepared for it, you run out of stuff to do, because you’ve never been able to deliver that much content in a year.“

Author: Kyle Stokes, Stateimpactindiana

Read more HERE>

 

One-on-One Speech Therapy Goes Digital

—Sean Simmers for Education Week

Eight year-old Gianna DeTara, viagra who lives in a rural community outside Scranton, viagra sale Pa., ailment participates from home in an online speech-therapy session. Gianna takes the lessons through her online charter school, Commonwealth Connections Academy. School districts nationwide are starting to turn to online speech therapy as a way to save money and ensure that hard-to-find therapists are available to their students.

Reece Barnes meets with his speech therapist every week. He walks down the hallway at his rural Burney, Calif. school and chats with her one-on-one, even though she is four hours away in another part of the state. Reece, who’s 8 and has a lisp and his sister Alexis, 12, who has partial deafness in one ear, have communicated with their therapist entirely online since the 1,150-student Fall River Joint Unified School District changed the way it provides speech therapy. The California district joined other schools nationwide that are now employing sometimes hard-to-find therapists via live, interactive computer sessions.

The use of online speech therapy is growing, said Janet Brown, the director of health-care services in speech-language pathology for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, or ASHA, based in Rockville, Md. The organization endorses online or teletherapy as long as the quality of the service is the same as for in-person therapy, said Deborah Dixon, the director of school services for ASHA.

Demand Growing

Online forms of speech and language therapy are drawing interest now as the number of children requiring therapy grows and as the role of the therapist has expanded beyond helping a child form words or correct a stutter or lisp. Still, more than a decade after the introduction of online therapy, students getting online speech lessons account for a sliver of the more than 1.1 million children ages 6 to 17 with a speech or language impediment.

Author: Nirvi Shah, Edweek

Read more HERE>